The Edward Taylor, in his book, Primitive

The start
of festivals or the development of festivals and its influence on individuals and
the immediate space is not a new occurrence. It is
strongly connected with the growth of human culture, which goes back to the past.(Klein
and Blake 2002).

            Sir Edward
Taylor, in his book, Primitive Culture,
Taylor characterized Culture as “that complex whole  which includes knowledge, believe, art, morals,
law, custom, and some other abilities and habits gained by man as an individual
in the society” (Taylor, 1871, p.1).

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Culture has however been defined by many
scholars and it is not practical to give a satisfying description of the term. Some
scholars like Nuckolls (1998)  in his
book, contended  that  “characterizing
culture is a problem that cannot be explained…..”. The solution lies in giving
a particular definition of culture while communicating with a specific gathering
because of the enormous number of definitions accessible.

            It should be
noted that culture is particularly multifaceted. The term
derives from the Latin word meaning cultivation or education. The word culture
was initially used to define the process of plant growing and animal breeding
controlled by man. Analogically, it began to be
utilized with reference to the advancement and self-change of individuals
(Williams 1976).

In Renaissance, culture was usually related with improvements
in writing, philosophy, legal order, as well as art and science, which was
thought vital for the best possible social progress. Later on, primal tribes
began to be recognized from civilized societies, where these components of culture
achieved a larger amount of development (Tylor EB, 1871; Kelley 1996).

            In the twentieth century, culture
became a essential trend, not only socially, but also economically and politically.
Its purpose was growing in the successive decades of the twentieth century, but
it was the most grounded towards the end of the century. In the 1970s and 1980s, people started to talk about the
cultural impacts in politics, economy and science (Barnett 1998; Ray and Sayer 1999; Barnes 2001).