Activity the contribution that the specialist function makes

Activity 1

1.1 
Human
Resource Professional Map (HRPM)

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The architecture of the CIPD map is simple and flexible. It
includes often professional areas, eight behaviors, and four bands.

1-     
Core
Professional Areas

Two professional areas sit at the heart of the HR profession and
apply to all HR specialties without regard to role, location, or career stage.
The main areas of professionalism entail leading human resource (HR) as well as
insight, strategy, and solutions.

a)                 
Insights,
Strategy, and Solutions

This area recommends HR personnel to develop knowledge of the organization
and its business environment. An HR professional can use this knowledge of the
organization and its external environment to meet the immediate and strategic
goals of the company.

b)                 
Leading
HR

This core professional area outlines the role of the top HR
manager. The map calls on HR practitioner to act as a role model leader by
perfecting the contribution that the specialist function makes in the entire
organization through individual efforts and by developing, supporting, and
assessing others.

c)                 
Organizational
Development

The practitioner is recommended to ensure proper design of the
organization to deliver largest effect in
the short- and long-term.

d)                
Organizational
development

The HR practitioner is recommended to find competencies to align
with strategy, personnel, and procedures to maximize effectiveness and reach
the goals of the organization. The practitioner should also design
interventions to mobilize the relevant culture, skills, and performances
besides giving leadership and insight on the change management, including its
strategy, planning, and execution.

e)                 
Resourcing
and Talent Planning

Under this professional area, the map calls for an HR to ensure
that the firm has the relevant talent, sources, and capabilities to do
ambitions in the present and in the future.

f)                  
Learning
and Development

Here, the map calls for an HR leader to develop employees and
organizational competencies and knowledge to achieve immediate and future
requirements. It also recommends the practitioner to develop a learning culture
to embed development of various capabilities.

g)                 
Performance
and Reward

Under this area, the map tells HR practitioners to help creation
and sustenance of an effective organizational culture through the delivery of a
program that recognizes and reward crucial capabilities, behaviors, skills,
performance, and experiences. The practitioner should offer a reasonable,
relevant, and cost-effective reward system as per the market trend.

h)                 
Employee
engagement

An HR leader should work to reinforce the connections that workers
have with their tasks, colleagues, and the firm to help them experience
fulfillment and contribute towards the firms’ goals. This approach will help
employees give special attention to effective management and leadership.

i)                   
Employee
relations

Under this area, an HR leader must guarantee that the individual
and the collective relationship between the company and its employees are
managed properly within a framework defined by the organizational culture,
policies, practices, and laws.

j)                   
Service
delivery and information

An HR practitioner should ensure customer-centered delivery of HR
services across the whole employee lifecycle, employing exceptional management
of processes and projects to achieve effective service delivery. The HR lead must also supply useful analytics to help
business improvement (Chartered Institute of
Personnel and Development .

Behaviors

This part of CIPD map outlines 8 behaviors and professional needs
of HR practitioner. Each of the behaviors is explain in all the four bands of
competence.

k)                 
Curious

An HR focuses on the future, is inquisitive and keeps his mind open
to ideas and options to add value to the company.

l)                   
Decisive
thinker

This corresponds to the ability to evaluate and understand data and
information easily. This behavior means that the HR professional can determine options, give recommendations, and
makes a strong decision based on
available information.

m)               
Skilled
Influencer

It describes the ability to mobilize the commitment and support of
others to further the mission and vision of the organization.

n)                 
Personally
Credible

This behavior describes an HR to
achieve professionalism by applying relevant skills to deliver value to the
firm.

o)                 
Collaborative

It describes the ability to work effectively and inclusively with
people inside and outside of the organization.

p)                 
Driven
to Deliver

An HR practitioner should express determination, creativity, and
purpose to achieve the best for the firm.

q)                 
Courage
to Challenge

The HR specialist approaches any challenge with courage. Speaks
courageously and confidently to challenge those resisting

r)                  
Role
Model

This behavior means leading by examples always. The HR
professional’s express integrity, fairness, and
autonomy in all them do.

s)                  
Bands

The understanding and practices enshrined in the ten professional
areas above are displayed in 4 bands together with behavioral statements. These
bands are described as follows: 

t)                  
Band
1

The HR responsibility under this band is delivering fundamentals.
It is client support and processing activity that can be immediate or
continuing.

u)                 
Band
2

It includes adviser and issues led. The HR roles include
recommending and managing HR problems, whether current or near-term.

v)                 
Band
3

It denotes consultant and co-operative partner roles. The HR
responsibilities involve addressing challenges at organizational levels, medium
or longer.

w)               
Band
4

It is the role of a coach. The responsibilities involve developing
the organizational strategy, and HR strategy, and collaborating with the customer.

Comments

The professional area that I relate to is the organizational
development about band one. The first activity associated with this area is
defining strategy. The activity that I consider the most essential is to
collate and structure contextual information about the current state of the company.
This activity is critical because it provides the HR professional with the
basis to approach the highlighted gaps in the business. Then, as an HR
professional, I can know what adjustment to make to fill that gap. Once these
gaps are filled, I can drive the organization towards the desired performance.

Activity 2

2.1       Understanding Customer Needs

To give prompt and effective services needs an HR specialist to
balance the needs of different customers to decide which to give priority over
another. When faced with three users of HR services, such as an employee, a
manager, and an outsourced firm, the HR practitioner must have an insight into
the needs of these different customers. The worker needs the training to know how to execute his responsibility. The manager needs coaching to help
them develop leadership skills and behaviors that motivate the subordinate
workers to commit to work. The outsourced company needs a temporary contract
defining its roles and responsibilities for the outsourced task. When faced
with these conflicting needs, an HR professional should give priority to the
outside firm because its activity is temporary and urgent. The problem the
company has been hired to fix has affected the
productivity of the organization. The second priority would be the
employee because his need corresponds to
the effective operation of the company. The coaching need of the manager will be the last to be addressed
because it involves continuing professional development, and thus, it is an
ongoing process.

2.2 
Effective
Communication

There are different methods of communication that an HR
practitioner can use to communicate with subordinate staff, superiors, or other
managers. The table below describes three different methods of communication
stipulating their strengths and shortcomings.

Method

Advantages

Disadvantages

Telephone

i.       
Immediate
feedback
ii.     
Opportunity
to clarify things
iii.   
It
is fast
 

i.       
The
message can be quickly forgotten
ii.     
It
is not easy to give legal evidence
iii.   
Poor
presentation of the message can lead to misunderstanding and wrong response.

Letter

i.                   
Allows
for permanent records
ii.                 
It
clarifies verbal message
iii.               
It
is good for making references
iv.               
It
is more specific

i.       
It
can take considerable time to produce
ii.     
It
is limited to people who have sight
iii.   
It
is not flexible
iv.   
The
feedback is not immediate, which in turn can slow down the decision-making process.
v.     
Poor
writing skills can hinder the effectiveness of a (Dhlodhlo 3)

Email

i.       
It
is fast 
ii.     
It
is cheaper 
 

i.                   
It
is less formal
ii.     
Organizing
and reading emails eat up employee’s time for production 
iii.   
Risk
of sharing sensitive information is high
iv.   
Jargons,
pronouns, abbreviations, and short descriptions can make the recipient
misunderstand/misinterpret the message (Bryant)

 

2.3 
Effective
Service Delivery

It includes delivering service on time, delivering service on a
budget, dealing with difficult customers, handling, and resolving complaints.
HR practitioners can use various techniques to deal with difficult customers.
The most common tactics are to understand and listen, to empathize with them,
to focus on solutions, and to exceed expectation. Difficult customers desire to
be heard, that is why it is important for an HR practitioner to express concern
for their problems by listening to them. It is very crucial to develop an
insight into what is causing the negative reaction from the customer to devise
a solution to solve whatever is the reason for the customer’s unhappiness. The
HR professional should express empathy to the customer by expressing genuine
concern for the troubles the customer is experiencing. Taking time to express
concerns about this type of customer calms them down (Yagil and Luria 932). Once the source of the problem has been
localized, the HR can focus on giving the best solution possible. Importantly,
the HR representative should explain to the customer how he or she would
resolve the customer’s grievance. However, in case the client declines a
proposed solution, ask them to suggest an immediate solution to their problem
and then work on how to grant their wish. Then, the HR should focus on
exceeding his or her expectation to achieve their satisfaction (Yagil and Luria 933). Exceeding difficult
customers’ expectation can entail taking extra time to understand their
grievances and giving solutions quickly.

Customers are likely to differentiate the process of complaint from
consequences (Hansen et al. 4). In
expressing their dissatisfaction, customers usually preoccupy themselves with
getting perceived fairness of a service or product. In fact, they may be more
concerned with getting a fair and a sober procedural treatment than a specific
outcome of the complaint. In the same vein, customers decide to complain
because they perceive some form of loss (Hansen et al. 4). As a result, choosing to compensate them for the
perceived loss will come a long way in achieving their satisfaction.